The Myths Behind Porn

By Rachel

Why shouldn’t you ever have this look on your face?

There is an extreme misconception about men who watch porn. Some women think that these men are pathetic, can’t get a woman of their own, are perverts, sexual deviants, or live in their parent’s basements. They think this is a fantasy world that is unattainable for any man so they live vicariously through these movies.

I used to be appalled by porn. My one ex used to watch it on MY LAPTOP when I wasn’t at home. And then he had the audacity to lie and blame my brothers! Ummm…my brothers have their own laptops. Why would they watch on MY laptop? It offended me that he would do this. Looking back I think I am more offended that he lied to me than that he was watching porn. Fess up at the very least! When I type an “M” into the browser thinking I will immediately get rerouted to Myspace (yeah it was a few years ago), but I am instead greeted with a URL for something about Miss Kitty’s Pussy or some shit, who the fuck are you fooling? That’s not my website.

As I’ve grown older though, I have actually taken the time to attempt to understand why men like porn and why some women like it. At this point, it doesn’t even phase me. I mean, some of it makes me uncomfortable because of what is going on, but for the most part, a lot of it can be really sexy and inspiring for your own personal bedroom use.

How did I grow comfortable with porn? I talked about it with guys and I watched for myself with guys.

I used to be uncomfortable with it mostly because of the guy from my “50 Shades of Domestic Violence” blog, but he forced me into watching videos of girls getting all but raped by guys. These were hidden camera videos where dumb girls would go on job interviews and have to fuck the boss and the dude would cum all over their face and then kick them out of the office before they could put their clothes back on.

And then he would belittle me  and say that that is what he thought I was like behind his back. Real nice guy, right? Why would I be comfortable with porn when this is the example he had set for me, on top of making me feel like I was some type of whore when he was the one cheating on me the whole fucking time?

As time went on and I entered into healthier relationships, I found a happy medium and took it upon myself to understand the fascination with porn.

It isn’t exactly about a guy having these girls with bodies that are unattainable to most of us: skinny, perfect (but a lot of times fake) breasts, flawless skin, bikini waxing that is intimidating to most women, and the ability to live this extremely free and sexual life without much consequence and out in the open for the world to see at their leisure. It’s intimidating as hell for the average girl! How do you compete with that?

You don’t have to and it is likely that you aren’t. Chances are, he is visualizing you in that position and using it as stimulus for his time with you. Other times, it is a guy watching something that he wants to try with you, but he isn’t sure how comfortable you will be with whatever is happening on screen and isn’t sure how to breach the subject with you.

Other reasons he may watch porn: Instant gratification. You’re not there. He is in the mood. What’s a guy to do? Guys need stimulus. I can conjure up something pretty hot in my head quickly, but guys don’t always work that way. They need a push. Porn gives them that push.

They also know exactly what they are getting with porn. With you, not so much. This is something almost comforting and pressure free because the surprises of daily life don’t exist in this fantasy world. You can help him bring this to life though!

Not all porn is disgusting and raunchy. Some of it can be quite normal by the average person’s standards. Normal positions, just loud and with some dirty talk.

Here are my tips for you becoming more comfortable with porn and enjoying it with your man or by yourself:

1. Sit down with your beau and talk CALMLY about why he likes porn and what types he likes. Ask good, probing questions. Be specific. And also let him know what about it turns you off, worries you, or upsets you. Be completely open and non-confrontational about this. Let him know that this is about you trying to understand him and his desires.

2. Ask for him to show you some examples of porn stars and videos that he is into. When it is over, discuss what he liked about it. Ask him what about it was such a turn on.

3. It’s your turn now. Tell him what you dug about it. There had to have been something about at least one out of three videos that you liked, whether it was a position you want to try an outfit or role play that you think would be hot, or something about what they were showing and how that got you feeling a little squirmy in your seat. (The good kind of squirmy!)

4. Now, here is the big step (work up to this). Start sifting through the sites he recommends (ya know, ones that aren’t going to break your computer and riddle you with viruses). Be open! You may have to look for awhile before you find something you like, but trust me. You will run into something that you think could be real sexy- the positions, the setting, etc. Find those videos, show your man, and tell him why you picked those videos out and then ask him what he likes about them.

Fair warning: dudes in porn are typically not that great to look at. Apparently guys who are low on the looks food chain are blessed with huge cocks. Nature is cruel. (Also, ladies, keep in mind that size honestly doesn’t matter. Seriously. It doesn’t. It is what you do with it and how you fit one another’s bodies. Find positions that work for you. Make sure your man knows this.)

So, there you have it. Stop knocking on guys who love a little porn in their life. As long as it doesn’t rule his life, then he probably has a really healthy relationship with porn and his sexuality. Let this be a tool to fuel your sex life and not hinder it!

12 thoughts on “The Myths Behind Porn

  1. Linnea Smith By Patricia Barrera
    Linnea Smith is your average woman of the 90s. She has a satisfying family life, rewarding career in mental health and interests that include traveling with her husband, spending time with her daughters, babying her dogs and reading pornography. Yes…reading pornography–and using her professional skills and expanding international network to fight it. Like most of us, she never really thought about pornography as a critical social issue until a 1985 media conference where she learned about past and present research on pornographic materials. And what she learned shocked and angered her.

    As a psychiatrist, feminist, and woman, she was well aware of the personal and societal consequences of battery, rape, and child sexual abuse. The results of the studies delivered at that fateful conference were an indictment to the connection of pornographic materials, both directly and indirectly, with these violent sex crimes. For Smith, pornography became an issue of public health and human rights that needed to be addressed.

    As every critical thinker should, Smith went straight to the source to see for herself what was going on. She turned to Playboy, the nation’s first pornography magazine to earn mainstream acceptance and support. By 1984 Playboy had 4.2 million subscribers, and was selling 1.9 million magazines at newsstands (Miller, 1984).

    The results of her extensive investigation of the magazine (from the 1960s on) are presented in three brochures. “It’s Not Child’s Play” is a disturbing brochure that outlines the specific ways in which Playboy sexualizes small children and presents them as sexual targets for adult males in their magazine. The collection of cartoons and pictorials is damning, and made even more so when juxtaposed against pathetic statements made by Playboy representatives denying they ever used children in their publication. Smith very well could have called the brochure “Playboy Exposed”.

    Right alongside their claims that “Playboy never has, never will” publish such offensive imagery (Playboy, December, 1985), Smith placed pictures the magazine did indeed publish- of children in sexual encounters with adults and references to girl children as ‘Playmate’ material. In December of 1978, for example, Playboy published a picture of a five year old girl with the caption “my first topless picture,” and in March of that same year published a cartoon in which Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz is pointing out the Lion, Scarecrow, and Tin Man to a police officer as having just raped her on the yellow brick road.

    Smith did not limit her investigation to the use of children in Playboy. She found jokes about sexual harassment, abuse, manipulation, dehumanization and avoidance of intimacy by men toward their partners and callousness toward women in general, and the promotion of sexual conquest over women instead of sexual intimacy with a woman.

    In another powerful and well documented brochure, “As Sex Education, Men’s Magazines are Foul PLAY, BOYS!,” Smith once again had Playboy do the talking for her. The brochure featured Playboy cartoons that dehumanized women like the one in which a man was shown holding a pornography magazine over his girlfriend’s face and body as they are having sex (Playboy, August, 1974), and another featuring a taxidermist calling a man to come and pick up his wife, who had been stuffed (Playboy, April, 1995). Was she hunted down and killed, too?

    Smith’s brochures include extensive documentation and commentary by recognized scholars and researchers addressing the impact of pornography on our society. There are chilling statistics, like the finding that 100% of all high school aged males in one survey reported having read or looked at pornography, with the average age of viewing the first issue being 11 years old (Bryant, testimony to the Attorney General’s Commission on Pornography Hearings, 1985).

    In another study she lists, three per cent of the women in a random sample and 8.5 per cent in a survey of college undergraduate women reported being physically coerced into sex by someone inspired by pornography. Ten per cent of the nonstudent and 24 per cent of the student respondents answered yes to the question of whether they had ever been upset by someone trying to get them to do something out of a pornographic book, movie, or magazine (cited by Anderson in Lederer and Delgado, eds., 1995).

    Also included is a study conducted by Mary Koss on 6,000 college students in which she found that men reporting behavior meeting legal definitions of rape were significantly more likely to be frequent readers of pornography magazines than those men who did not report engaging in such behavior (Koss and Dinero, 1989).

    Smith is one of few people to expand her analysis of pornographic magazines to include the presence of drugs and alcohol, especially important today considering the almost epidemic level of drug and alcohol use by adults and teenagers in this country, Smith agrees that drugs and alcohol are contributing factors to high risk and coercive sex, and that the relationship between them within pornographic materials is an overlooked, and greatly needed, area of research.

    As Smith explains ” . . . No [other] reputable publication brought positive drug information within easy reach of juvenile (or adult) consumers. Since 1970, Playboy has been glamorizing intoxication as a mind-expanding, sexually-enhancing experience. It is difficult to conclude these magazines have not played a major role in popularizing ‘recreational’ drug consumption and the myth of its being fun, risk-free, and even sexy. What greater reinforcement for drug taking behavior than to eroticize it?”

    In “Drug Coverage in Playboy Magazine,” a brochure she developed for the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association), Smith compiled a plethora of cartoons that favorably paired sex with drugs and alcohol. Cartoons, articles and columns advise readers on how to use drugs for sexual enhancement. References to negative effects were usually humorously presented and so, easily dismissed.

    Playboy’s depiction of underage users of drugs and alcohol even included their own version of the Official Boy Scout Handbook in (Playboy, August, 1984). Their suggestions for Scout Merit Badges included “Water Safety” for the scout who ordered his Johnnie Walker whiskey straight up, and “Free-Basing” for the scout who smoked cocaine. A similar feature in 1979 stated that “Today, ‘boyhood fun’ means cruising and scoring; overnight adventures’ involve Ripple and car stripping; and ‘survival skills include cocaine testing, bust evasion and cutting into gas lines” (Playboy, December, 1979).

    Once Smith contacted the NCAA about her serious concerns, media attention and public scrutiny increased. Playboy denied any wrongdoing, claiming they were only reflecting a “major cultural phenomena”, but they did scale back the more obvious pro-drug and alcohol features in the magazine. damage control campaign resulted in a politically correct editorial statement on the magazine’s position on drug abuse in the May 1987 issue as well as a few anti-drug articles. To counter Smith’s NCAA attempts, the magazine also courted collegiate sports information offices with a mass mailing of a hastily compiled slick, glossy booklet “The Dangers of Drugs”, explaining their “real” position against substance abuse. However the magazine still includes covert messages glamorizing substance abuse and pairing sexualized alcohol consumption with easier prey. According to Smith, “we succeeded in exposing yet another dimension of the destructive nature of pornography, and, at the very least, cost Playboy some time and money.”

    It may also cost Playboy the niche they are trying to carve out for themselves in organized sports. Playboy’s strategy for commercial success has been to include respected and well- known public figures in their magazine, an old tactic for aspiring to legitimacy. That way the magazine may be looked at as more of a credible news journal than just a porno rag. Readers too, can feel better about their consumption of pornographic pictures of women when they are “wrapped” in articles about current social issues. It made business sense to Playboy to seek out an alliance with athletes who, in some countries, are accorded hero status.

    So they came up with an annual pre-season award for college level athletes and coaches, the Playboy All-America Award. The nominated players and coaches receive an all-expenses paid trip to a luxury resort for a weekend party, photo session and public relations blitz.

    The team selection process is unorthodox at best. It is not a panel of sports officials but rather Photography Director Gary Cole, doubling as sports editor when needed, (Playboy, March, 1996, p.117) who chooses players and coaches for the award. The prerequisite is not athletic ability but rather who agrees to be photographed for the magazine. Again, a common tactic for legitimacy. Playboy rejects players unwilling to have their pictures associated with the magazine- -its content and underlying messages–and keeps making “awards” until the sufficient number of players and coaches agree to the photo sessions. The event hit some legal snafus as well. Complaints were officially lodged with the NCAA which included the presence of professional agents at the photo sessions. This charge, like the others, was also denied by the magazine in a letter to the NCAA.

    Go to Part II

    • Psychiatrist Park Elliott Dietz On Porn Harms

      In 1994 I wrote to psychiatrist Dr.Linnea Smith about my experience and the harms of pornography. She wrote me back a very nice note and thanked me for my important efforts to educate people on the harms of porn. She said it’s especially difficult because the public is desensitzed and the media is reluctant to crititicize other media especially sexually explicit media. She sent me two huge folders full of important information on the harms including Playboy cartoons of women being sexually harassed in the workplace by their male bosses!

      One of the many things she sent me was a transcribed lecture by psychiatrist and law professor Dr.Park Elliott Dietz, and this lecture was given before the National Conference of State Legislators on August 5 1986 and was videotaped by C-Span. Dr. Dietz served as a commissioner on the Attorney General’s Commission on Pornography. He was professor of law,professor of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry,and Medical Director of The Institute of Law,Psychiatry and Medical Director of The Institute of Law,Psychiatry and Public Policy at The University of Virginia School of Law and School of Medicine.

      He gave many examples of women and children’s testimonies who were sexually abused by men who used pornography,and also women who were sexually harassed on the job with pornographic pictures hung up on the walls and shown to them. He said he only used a small sample of the 1000’s of women and children who testified. He says many times that pornography is a health problem and human rights issue and he said one of the reasons is because so much of it teaches false,misleading,and even dangerous information about human sexuality.

      This is what he said a person would learn about sexuality from pornography, “A person who learned about human sexuality in the “adults only” pornography outlets of America would be a person,who had never conceived of a man and woman marrying or even falling in love before having intercourse,who had never conceived of two people making love in privacy without guilt or fear of discovery,who had never conceived of tender foreplay,who had never conceived of vaginal intercourse with ejaculation during intromission,and who had never conceived of procreation as a purpose of sexual union.,

      Instead,such a person would be one who had learned that sex at home meant sex with one’s children,stepchildren,parents,stepparents,siblings,cousins,nephews,nieces,aunts,uncles,and pets,and with neighbors,milkmen,plumbers,salesmen,burglars,and peepers,who had learned that people take off their clothes and have sex within the first 5 minutes of meeting one another,who had learned to misjudge the percentage of women who prepare for sex by shaving their pubic hair,having their breasts,buttocks or legs tattooed,having their nipples or labia pierced,or donning leather,latex,rubber,or childlike costumes,who had learned to misjudge the proportion of men who prepare for sex by having their genitals or nipples pierced,wearing women’s clothing,or growing breasts.

      Who had learned that about 1 out of 5 sexual encounters involves spankning,whipping,fighting,wrestling,tying,chaining,gagging,or torture,who had learned that more than 1 in 10 sexaul acts involves a party of more than 2,who had learned that the purpose of ejaculation is that of soiling the mouths,faces,breasts,abdomens,backs,and food at which it’s always aimed,who had learned that body cavities were designed for the insertion of foreign objects,who had learned that the anus was a genital to be licked and penetrated,who had learned that urine and excrement are erotic materials,who had learned that the instruments of sex chemicals,handcuffs,gags,hoods,restraints,harnesses,police badges,knives,guns,whips,paddles,toilets,diapers,enema bags,inflatable rubber women,and disembodied vaginas,breasts,and penises,who had learned that except with the children,where secrecy was required,photographers and cameras were supposed to be present to capture the action so that it could be spread abroad.

      If these were the only adverse consequences of pornography,the most straightforward remedy would be to provide factually accurate information on human sexuality to people before they are exposed to pornography,if only we could agree on what that information is,on who should provide it to the many children whose parents are incapable of doing so,and on effective and acceptable means by which to ensure that exposure not precede education. In the absense of such a remedy,the probable consequences in this area alone are sufficient to support recommendations that would reduce the dissemination of that pornography which teaches false,misleading or dangerous information about human sexuality. And these are not the only adverse consequences of pornography.

      He then says before he gives more examples and research,that pornography is a health problem and human rights issue because it increases the probability that members of the exposed population will acquire attitudes that are detrimental to the physical and mental health of both those exposed and those around them,pornography is a health problem and human rights issue because it is used as an instrument of sexual abuse and sexual harassment.

      And look where we are now!

      • The Daily Illini

        The Independent Student Newspaper

        Column: Pornography: a vicious cycle
        Dan Mollison

        Updated: October 26th, 2005 – 12:00 AM

        Tagged with: Dan Mollison, Person Email Address, Technology, Opinions

        What part of the entertainment industry is bigger than the NFL, the NBA and the MLB combined?

        You guessed it – it’s pornography. The porn industry has grown into a $10 billion a year business, with some of our nation’s best-known corporations – including General Motors, AOL Time Warner, Marriott, Hilton and Westin – silently raking in big profits from pornography without mentioning it in their company records. Pornography has become so pervasive that in 2003, Americans spent more money on porn than they did on going to see Hollywood movies.

        Even though pornography stretches into the homes of millions of Americans, we don’t openly talk about it much. We’re even less likely to discuss how those who use pornography – who are primarily men – might be affected by seeing these images. I recently had the opportunity to be part of such a discussion, and I came away from it with a new perspective on how the men in my life, including myself, have been impacted by our exposure to pornography. When men choose to use porn, their lives and relationships pay the price.

        I was at Indiana University for a men’s conference on sexual assault prevention last weekend, and we talked about pornography’s influence on men. We focused on the type of pornography that is consumed the majority of the time, the graphic material that depicts a man – or men – sexually dominating a woman. These films usually include a standard series of sex acts including oral, vaginal and anal penetration, which are often performed while the men call the women by a multitude of derogatory names. While they’re being penetrated, women are expected to say over and over again how much they like the sex. And when the man reaches orgasm, he will typically ejaculate on the woman’s body, sometimes on her face.

        These sex scenes convey to viewers the idea that women are not human but rather are objects to be used by men to satisfy male sexual desires. In order for a man to get pleasure from watching a woman being verbally, sexually and sometimes physically abused, he has to deny the woman’s humanity. If he’s thinking about the fact that this woman has the same feelings, relationships with loved ones, dreams and aspirations as his mother, his sisters and his female friends, there is no way he would be aroused by a scene in which a man treats a woman like garbage as he’s penetrating her; he’d find it sickening. Pornography dehumanizes women, and when a man is exposed to it for a long period of time, it becomes easier for him to ignore the humanity of the women in his life.

        One of the men at the conference shared how his past experiences with pornography have had a deep impact on his life. Like many of his peers, he was first exposed to pornography in middle school, years before he would have his first serious sexual experience with a woman. Pornography offered him a rare glimpse into the world of sex that nobody was talking about, and because he wasn’t given accurate information about what sex was like, he started to believe that the acts he had been witnessing in pornography – of men sexually dominating women – is what sex is supposed to be. He then carried these beliefs into his romantic relationships, and caused his partners, and himself, a lot of undue grief.

        This experience has become a downright common one for men, and it’s truthfully a hard bind to be in. Pornography offers men a taste of something they can never have, a feeling of being completely in control. But when men return from these fantasies to a world that doesn’t always go their way, they crave the feeling of being powerful even more; and they may even seek it out in their relationships.

        To me, being a man means accepting that I won’t always get my way in life. It’s difficult to escape from the trap that pornography sets on men, but it will always be more satisfying – and more manly – to respect women, rather than use them.

        Dan Mollison is a junior in LAS. His column appears every Wednesday. He can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.

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          WAVE: Women Against a
          Violent Environment

          Porn Insidiously Devalues Women

          by Barbara Kasper and Barbara Moore

          Originally published in the October 27, 1994 Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY)

          There has been much discussion about the airing of the public access show on cable television called Life Without Shame. While many in our community do not want the show to air, there seems to be little we can do to stop it. There are so many rights in the way: the right to adult etertainment, the right to sexual expression, constitutional rights of free speech, and the rights of business owners.

          One right which has been given little attention in this debate is human rights — specifically the rights of women.

          We feel that pornography is harmful to women and that as women we have the right to live in a society free of this harm. Pornography degrades women. It defines us through our body parts. It encourages self-hatred in women because we can never “measure up” to the women seen in pornography. We dare not grow old or become overweight. In pornography, women are rewarded for fulfilling males’ fantasies — being either the passive “good girl” or the insatiable whore.

          More importantly, pornography frequently eroticizes violence. We do not believe that every man who watches Life Without Shame will become a rapist or beat his wife or girlfriend. However, we do feel that misogynistic sexual entertainment for men portrays the humiliation of women as “sexy” and presents women as two-dimensional beings.

          In a world where women are being raped, stalked, beaten, and killed in epidemic proportions, pornography conditions too many men to “get off by putting women down.” Eventually, viewing enough pornography can desensitize all of us so that we do not even question the devaluation of women in our society.

          We believe that the number of rapes and assaults on women would be drastically reduced — but not entirely eliminated — if pornography were to disappear. We believe that pornography often serves as a cultural backdrop, if not actually a catalyst, for the sexual exploitation and abuse of women.

          Pornography sells. Men spend more than $8 billion a year on pornography. What is sells is lies about women and their response to sex. Pornography frequently portrays women as mindless, childlike and submissive. We are “pets” or “playmates.” Other forms of pornography depict omen who enjoy being raped, spanked, tied up or mutilated.

          Would there be any real need for debate if viewers of cable television were exposed to programming that featured the consistent abuse and humiliating of Jews, African Americans or the elderly? Would everyone who objected to such programming be encouraged to simply “change the channel”? Yet when women are the victims, issues surrounding censorship and First Amendment rights are raised impeding progress toward real solutions.

          Many young males state that their first sexual experience was masturbating to pornography. Think of what this pornography then says to these men — that women like to be treated like objects, treated with contempt, and enjoy eroticized violence. Women in pornography never say “no,” or if they do, they don’t really mean it. Women in porn are really men’s property — always available and ready. pornography, therefore, reinforces inequity in relationships. It is difficult to believe that men can use pornography and at the same time truly respect the women in their lives.

          Far too many people believe that they have the right to control those to whom they feel superior. We know rape is not a crime of passion but rather an act of power and control. The same is true of domestic violence, sexual harassment and incest.

          Who benefits from pornography? Who finances pornography? Who is behind the camera? Who buys it?

          Who has the power?

          We need to stop the lies that pornography tells about women and sex and tell the truth. The truth is that pornography supports a larger culture that hurts, exploits and discriminates against women. Unfortunately, far too often when we tell the truth we are accused of taking away rights. As Catherine MacKinnon and Andrea Dworkin, who have written books against pornography, state: “Take away wrongful power and you will be accused of taking away rights. Often, this will be true because the law, under the guise of protecting rights, protects power.”

          Whose rights should take precedence? Is it the pornographers who produce Life Without Shame? Or is it the majority of us who want to live in a society which does not allow the subordination, degradation or violation of women?

          Contact us:
          info@rochesternow.org
          585-234-7019
          P.O. Box 93196, Rochester, NY 14692

          • STUDY PROVES “PORNOGRAPHY IS HARMFUL”
            by LifeSiteNews.com

            Tue Mar 12, 2002 12:15 EST
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            “Findings are Alarming”; 12,000 Participants in Study

            CALGARY, March 12, 2002 (LSN.ca) – A new study has found that viewing pornography is harmful to the viewer and society. In a meta-analysis (a statistical integration of all existing scientific data), researchers have found that using pornographic materials leads to several behavioral, psychological and social problems.

            One of the most common psychological problems is a deviant attitude towards intimate relationships such as perceptions of sexual dominance, submissiveness, sex role stereotyping or viewing persons as sexual objects. Behavioral problems include fetishes and excessive or ritualistic masturbation. Sexual aggressiveness, sexually hostile and violent behaviours are social problems as well as individual problems that are linked to pornography.

            “Our findings are very alarming”, said Dr. Claudio Violato one of the co-authors of the study. Dr. Violato, Director of Research at the National Foundation for Family Research and Education (NFFRE) and a professor at the University of Calgary, said “This is a very serious social problem since pornography is so widespread nowadays and easily accessible on the internet, television, videos and print materials”.

            Studies have shown that almost all men and most women have been exposed to pornography. An increasing number of children are also being exposed to explicitly sexual materials through mass media. The rise in sexual crimes, sexual dysfunction and family breakdown may be linked to the increased availability and use of pornography. The rape myth (belief that women cause and enjoy rape, and that rapists are normal) is very widespread in habitual male users of pornography according to the study.

            “There has been some debate among researchers about the degree of negative consequences of habitual use of pornography, but we feel confident in our findings that pornography is harmful”, Violato noted. “Our study involved more than 12,000 participants and very rigorous analyses. I can think of no beneficial effects of pornography whatsoever. As a society we need to move towards eradicating it”.

            The authors of the study concluded that exposure to pornography puts viewers at increased risk for developing sexually deviant tendencies, committing sexual offences, experiencing difficulties in intimate relationships, and accepting of the rape myth. Dr. Elizabeth Oddone-Paolucci and Dr. Mark Genuis, researchers at the National Foundation for Family Research and Education, are co-authors of the study that was published in the scientific journal Mind, Medicine and Adolescence.

            For more information see NFFRE at: http://www.nffre.com

            All content copyright 1997-2010 LifeSiteNews.com, all rights reserved. | Legal Information | Privacy Policy

            • ANOTHER LOOK AT CENTERFOLDS
              NOTE: This website contains material that may be offensive. All visuals are drawn from Playboy magazine. The purpose of this website is educational. Research in the field of sexual media indicates that the actual use of the material is far more effective than just text in relaying the covert messages and harmful implications of pornography. We have used the least explicit yet still representative examples.

              YES, I’M OVER EIGHTEEN AND I WISH TO PROCEED

              Playing With Boys’ Fantasies… Is Not a Game
              PART I PART II PART III PART IV

              Child Magnets Help Attract a Young Audience
              PART I PART II

              Targeting Children is Big Bu$iness
              PART I PART II

              Soft Core’s Hard Sell
              PART I PART II PART III

              Sex with a Scorecard
              PART I PART II

              Is There Anything about Children NOT for Sale?
              PART I PART II PART III

              Youth Public Health Unzipped
              PART I PART II

              A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Sexist Words
              PART I PART II

              The Pornography Party Line: Sexualizing Inequality, Teaching Contempt
              PART I PART II

              The Sexual Subordination of Women Puts Females at Greater Risk for Harassment, Manipulation, and Harm
              PART I PART II PART III PART IV

              Readers are Sexually Shortsheeted by Messages Devaluing Relationship, Intimacy and Partnership.
              PART I PART II PART III

              Soft Core is Costly “Speech” for a Free Society

              PART I PART II PART III PART IV

              “I Read Playboy for the Articles…” But Do You Get the Message?
              PART I PART II

              Activism Section

              We All Need to Take A Closer Look

              And Work Together for Social Justice

              People Take Action: What YOU Can do

              Beyond the Cost of Pornography

              Bar Endnotes

              Men who said NO to PLAYBOY
              Project Director
              Linnea Smith
              WebCrafter
              Nikki Craft

              For more information, contact:
              Linnea Smith, M.D., P.O. Box 16413, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

              This complete Playboy brochure is available for downloading and viewing on Acrobat Reader. For more information on getting this brochure with Acrobat go to Linnea Smith’s Homepage. Or the brochure can be read directly from your WWW browser.

              Since Feb 18, 1998

              • There was a university of Pennsylvania student who was gang raped in 1990 after college men watched porn videos in their dorms.And I still have a 1985 letter written into Mademoiselle Magazine by a woman who wrote in response to Peter Nelson’s His Column,Why Nice Guys Like Playboy,she wrote from Allendale New Jersey,”I just finished reading Peter Nelson’s His Colum.Peter Nelson is certainly no nice guy,nor is any participant in pornography, a trade which profits from the exploitation of women.Why I must ask does a so-called “woman’ magazine” feature editorials which support misogyny? Mr.Nelson’s callous disregard for women is
                evident in his neglect to face the fact that pornography promotes rape and violence .I know,because my best friend was raped by four men who used pornography as a reference guide.

                There were several articles that were online from MIT’s newspaper The Tech from 1983,1984 and 1985 about how women were being sexually harassed year after year in the 1980’s after men watched hardcore porn videos on campus the university lecture hall and of because of the sexual harassment of women students after the showings. Rhea Becker from the sadly former Women’s Alliance Against Pornography Education Project in Cambridge,sent me a lot of research on the harms of pornography back in 1991.One of the things she sent me included information that North Carolina State Representavie Richard Wright-Democrat,while announcing enactment of anti-pornography legislation he sponsored,cited a N.C. State Police study which found:defendants in 75% of the violent sex crimes in the state”had some kind of hard-core pornographic material” in their homes or vechicles.”I’m talking about S&M (sadistic & masochistic)
                material,bondage he said,that came from The New York Times 1/26/86 &
                10/13/85;The Virginian Pilot 10/20/85 and the articles were contributed by Alexandra Basil,Ray Lynn Oliver;Barbara Sparrow.

                The information also included a study conducted by the Michigan State Police in which 38,000 sexual assaults from 1956 to 1979 were analyzed found that in at least 41% of those crimes,pornography was used or imitated just prior to or during the act this came from Ladies Home Journal October 1985.The information Rhea sent me also included that a study of 36 convicted sexually oriented murderers/serial killers,found the single most common trait amongst them was 81% listed their primary sexual interest as pornography,71% voyeurism.The study’s objective,conducted by the FBI’s behavioral science unit in Quantico,Virginia,was to develop a psychological profile on sex killers in order to track them faster.The researchers concluded,after interviews with the 36 who collectively provided information on 1,188 murders,that the killers were characteristically immeresed in fantasy,this came from NY Daily News 6/26/85 and This World 7/14/85.

                Feminist psychologist Phyllis Chesler says in her
                book,Patriarchy:Notes Of An Expert Witness that serial killers are obessed with pornography and woman hatred and sexually use their victime both before and after killing them,and she said most wife beaters,pedaphiles,rapists and serial killers of women are addicted to pornography. Nobody would need to do studies
                to prove that racist and anti-semetic pornography is very harmful to Blacks
                and Jews and it never would have been mainstreamed and made acceptable!

                Dr.Gene Abel also found that more than 50% of sex offenders used
                pornography and that they were less able to control their abusive behavior than sex offenders who didn’t use it. Psychiatrist Dr.William Marshall who treats rapists and child molesters,found that 86% of rapists regularly use pornography and that 57% imitate pornographic scenes in the commiting of their crimes he also found that in a study of convicted child molesters in Ontario Canada,77% of those who molested boys and 87% of those who molested girls said they were regular users of hard-core pornography.

                • Cindi, while I appreciate you attempting to educate me on porn and rape, there is also a very large population out there who have a completely healthy relationship with pornography who do not use it for nefarious causes. That can be said of almost anything. Anything in the world can be turned around and used for evil rather than good. It is a shame, but it is the truth. For everyone one psychotic person out there, there are plenty more who can utilize any sort of stimulus in a healthy and productive manner.

                  I am not using my blog as a bully-pullpit to support misogyny. What I do use my website for it is so support healthy and open sexual communication in relationships and to promote mutual, and consensual exploration of one’s desires with their partner. If you would read my blog “Cheating without Touching” I explicitly state that things such as porn should not be used to promote bad behavior and talk about people who need to seek help for mental problems that are plaguing them. http://mytiarascrooked.com/2012/10/25/cheating-without-touching/

                  As much as I don’t believe that video games cause murder and violence, I don’t believe that porn single-handedly causes rape. A person whom is disturbed and evil causes murder and rape. My current partner watches porn, and he has never treated me with anything but dignity, respect, and care. Should I be on “rape” alert? These distinctions can be drawn from anything. The point is, when someone wants to do something evil and wrong, they are going to do it and any number of things can be utilized as their scapegoat.

                  I know hundreds of men who watch porn, and not one of them has ever done anything to disrespect a woman. I also know a lot of women who enjoy pornography, myself included. This does not mean I promote misogyny or violence against women. It simply means that I have a healthy understanding of what it is and how it can be used for pleasure and have a grasp on reality. That is the majority of the population.

                  I thank you for your time, but I don’t see this turning into a situation where you respect my opinion and we have a lively conversation over the subject, but this is my website and I do welcome the opinions of others, regardless if I agree or disagree with them. As long as everything is communicate in an adult and peaceful manner, you are entitled to your opinion.

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